girl grampa.

Forever student. Fake nerd girl. Aes Sedai (Blue Ajah, obvs). Feminist.

Dearest Body

In one of my classes, we’ve been assigned the task of writing a love letter to our body.  It’s for reals an eye-rolling kind of thing to have to do, but I was surprised to find how meaningful it started to feel, so I’m posting it here.  I doubt it would interest anyone else nearly as much as it interests me, but contributing to these conversations is always more helpful than staying silent, right?  It’s no Dear Sweet Body, which is of course the model we were given, but it’s honest and gross and maybe a bit melodramatic because I am not a writer, and I kind of like it.

Read More

It’s kind of weird how poorly my closet reflects the way I usually dress.

It’s kind of weird how poorly my closet reflects the way I usually dress.

It’s fun to procrastinate! 🚫📝

It’s fun to procrastinate! 🚫📝

fashionfever:

 


Streetstyle: Kim Sung Hee in LFW Spring 2015

fashionfever:

 

Streetstyle: Kim Sung Hee in LFW Spring 2015

(Source: koreanmodel)

comicsalliance:

FEAR AS A WAY OF LIFE: WHY WOMEN IN COMICS DON’T ‘JUST REPORT’ SEXUAL HARASSMENT
By Juliet Kahn
“If the harassment is so bad, why don’t women just report it?”

“I want to believe these women, but if they’re not willing to come forth and put their name to these accusations, I just can’t.”

“These claims of harassment are all so overblown. I never see it happening.”

I have been a woman in the comics industry for a few months now. It has been wonderful. It has also been terrifying.

Terrifying in a way I’m used to, though. When you grow up enveloped in the miasma of “tits or GTFO,” “attention whore,” and “fake geek girl,” fear becomes the price you pay to enjoy your hobbies. You don’t even think of it as fear most of the time.

Sometimes you join in the fear mongering yourself, enjoying the a**hole glamour of not being too pussy to call another girl a slut. Sometimes you hide in woman-heavy spaces, which go maligned elsewhere (“Tumblrinas!”) but do a pretty solid job of keeping you safe. The fear comes back eventually, though, as a slew of graphic rape threats or a simple joke about “feminazis” you are expected to chuckle along with. It might be in response to a screed worthy of Andrea Dworkin—or maybe you just tweeted something about disliking Guardians of the Galaxy. What matters is that you were a woman with an opinion on the internet, and now you must be punished. You must be made to fear.

Fear is also meant to keep us safe from sexual harassment, assault and abuse. We’re told not to stay out too late, not to go out alone, not to drink, not to lead anyone on, not to go home with anyone, not to ever feel safe in any situation that a man might take advantage of. If you fear the (implicitly common) worst from the men around you, you will escape it. When harassment, assault, and abuse take place anyway, fear is often a distinctly purposeful element of the encounter. Sometimes, this is subtle—it might take place in a deliberately secluded spot, or the perpetrator might be in a position of power over your future. Or, in the case of rape-and-death-threat style online harassment, the naked point of it might be to instill fear. After the harassment, assault, or abuse has taken place, it is fear that keeps women from speaking out. Fear of being branded the whiny bitch, of enduring the Anita Sarkeesian experience, or having one’s career torpedoed by a thousand nerds high on a lifetime’s worth of entitlement and vitriol.

Fear is what keeps us silent. Fear is what keeps men from understanding the ubiquity of these experiences. Fear is what keeps us from attaching a name to our allegations. Fear is what makes harassment, assault, and abuse a rite of passage for women in this industry and the world beyond. Fear, in this society, is what makes you a woman. And fear, in extinguishing discussion of its cruelties, keeps us from understanding its nature and better dismantling it.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

FEAR AS A WAY OF LIFE: WHY WOMEN IN COMICS DON’T ‘JUST REPORT’ SEXUAL HARASSMENT

By Juliet Kahn

“If the harassment is so bad, why don’t women just report it?”

“I want to believe these women, but if they’re not willing to come forth and put their name to these accusations, I just can’t.”

“These claims of harassment are all so overblown. I never see it happening.”

I have been a woman in the comics industry for a few months now. It has been wonderful. It has also been terrifying.

Terrifying in a way I’m used to, though. When you grow up enveloped in the miasma of “tits or GTFO,” “attention whore,” and “fake geek girl,” fear becomes the price you pay to enjoy your hobbies. You don’t even think of it as fear most of the time.

Sometimes you join in the fear mongering yourself, enjoying the a**hole glamour of not being too pussy to call another girl a slut. Sometimes you hide in woman-heavy spaces, which go maligned elsewhere (“Tumblrinas!”) but do a pretty solid job of keeping you safe. The fear comes back eventually, though, as a slew of graphic rape threats or a simple joke about “feminazis” you are expected to chuckle along with. It might be in response to a screed worthy of Andrea Dworkin—or maybe you just tweeted something about disliking Guardians of the Galaxy. What matters is that you were a woman with an opinion on the internet, and now you must be punished. You must be made to fear.

Fear is also meant to keep us safe from sexual harassment, assault and abuse. We’re told not to stay out too late, not to go out alone, not to drink, not to lead anyone on, not to go home with anyone, not to ever feel safe in any situation that a man might take advantage of. If you fear the (implicitly common) worst from the men around you, you will escape it. When harassment, assault, and abuse take place anyway, fear is often a distinctly purposeful element of the encounter. Sometimes, this is subtle—it might take place in a deliberately secluded spot, or the perpetrator might be in a position of power over your future. Or, in the case of rape-and-death-threat style online harassment, the naked point of it might be to instill fear. After the harassment, assault, or abuse has taken place, it is fear that keeps women from speaking out. Fear of being branded the whiny bitch, of enduring the Anita Sarkeesian experience, or having one’s career torpedoed by a thousand nerds high on a lifetime’s worth of entitlement and vitriol.

Fear is what keeps us silent. Fear is what keeps men from understanding the ubiquity of these experiences. Fear is what keeps us from attaching a name to our allegations. Fear is what makes harassment, assault, and abuse a rite of passage for women in this industry and the world beyond. Fear, in this society, is what makes you a woman. And fear, in extinguishing discussion of its cruelties, keeps us from understanding its nature and better dismantling it.

READ MORE

(via iamacollectionofmiscellanyandtea)

themossman:

seriouslyamerica:

CAN WE TALK ABOUT THIS FOR A SECOND? Because this is my favorite part in the whole movie. Mulan is back to wearing traditionally feminine clothing, and Shan Yu is mocking her “Looks like you’re out of ideas.”

BUT Mulan is all FUCK NO and disarms that asshole with a GODDAMN SYMBOL OF FEMININITY.

NOT TODAY SHAN YU. NOT TODAY.

She defeats him with skills she already had, not by being LIKE A MAN.

THATS why Mulan is frikkin fantastic

(Source: tomhazeldine, via lexi-sedai)

When Doctors Discriminate → http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/11/opinion/sunday/when-doctors-discriminate.html?ref=health

micdotcom:

9 things everyone needs to stop saying to Black women

It’s not that talking to black women should be hard work, but people need to make a sincere effort to undo several years of unchecked, subtle racism and sexist microaggressions. And in the interest of elevating the conversation beyond the ridiculous tropes, here are a few of the most common statements that everyone should strongly consider avoiding while speaking with a black woman. 

Don’t ask “What exactly are you?” Follow micdotcom

(via socialjusticekoolaid)